ReWeave Creates Luxurious Sustainable Clothing Out of Interior Design Scraps

by | Sep 4, 2023 | FASHION, FASHION SCOOPS | 0 comments

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With their Los Angeles fashion firm ReWeave, Julie Benniardi and Debbie Ouyang have been repurposing premium interior design remnants for the last five years. With fresh partnerships on shoes with George Esquivel, streetwear with artist Halim Flowers, and a capsule collection with the venerable Venice textile firm Rubelli, they are currently growing their inventory.

“What happens to samples once the season is over?” was the first query that prompted the two textile-loving Pasadena neighbors to introduce fashion as a side venture of Benniardi’s interior design company.

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They make stools, pillows, and dog beds in addition to stylish off-the-shoulder blouses with nipped waists, puff sleeve blouses, playful camp shirts, culottes, hoodies, bombers, and overcoats, some with shearling accents, from interior design remnants from Armani, Holly Hunt, Christian Lacroix, Etro, and other brands. Dennis Miller represents the company in New York, while the Una Malan showroom is in Los Angeles.

Shirt by ReWeave x Rubelli

“In essence, there is a shortage of storage space, and the art and fashion schools are unable to accept additional items, so they are forced to discard them,” Ouyang said. “And we reasoned, what if we collaborated with Los Angeles showrooms, designed and manufactured everything in Los Angeles, and donated a portion of our profits to the Downtown L.A. Women’s Center as a way to give back to the community?” With our gift to job training, we expressly address our desire to have a social and environmental effect.

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They have gathered 12,000 pounds of cloth so far.

Many fabrics, such as chinoiserie silks, brocades, boucles, and velvets; tweeds, usually used for couches but accented with leather and shearling; sheers, usually used for curtains but as playful linings; and tropical patterns are all patchworked into their designs. Occasionally, they leave the clothes’ inside fabric grommets in place to give them a unique touch.

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A bucket hat costs $250, a shearling tote costs $800, and a coat costs $3,000.

Thus far, they have limited their sales to direct-to-consumer through their website and pop-up events including vintage expert Cameron Silver and other guests. 99 percent of their creations are unique. “A lot of people tell us, ‘I wish Barneys was still around,'” sadly said Benniardi.

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Customized works by novelist and artist Halim Flowers, who was sentenced to 40 years to life after being prosecuted as an adult at the age of 16 for participating in a criminal homicide in Washington, D.C., will be unveiled on Wednesday. After being released from the D.C. Department of Corrections as a youngster and becoming an activist for criminal justice reform, he recounted his experiences there for the Emmy-winning documentary “Thug Life in D.C.”

The words “Not for Cell” were touchingly printed on a shearling tote and patchwork working jacket.

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Halim Flowers x ReWeave tote

Ouyang said, “His story is quite amazing and he loves fashion.”

Through a customer, they were introduced to shoe designer George Esquivel, who has created patchwork mules out of ReWeave materials. The ReWeave x Esquivel and ReWeave x Halim Flowers collections are now available online.

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Beginning on September 27 in the Quintus showroom at the Pacific Design Center in Los Angeles, the Rubelli collection will be on display at Rubelli showrooms around the nation.

Benniardi and Ouyang will also be launching statement jewelry crafted from leftover cloth later this autumn. The inspiration for the design came from an interior designer named Hutton Wilkinson and his wife Ruth, who were usually dripping in diamonds, sending them off with plenty of fabric remnants from Tony Duquette’s fabled Dawnridge residence.

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Chain made of reweave

“Our network is expanded and we are able to use the fabrics in new ways thanks to the collaborations,” Ouyang said.

Businesswomen, Art Basel attendees, and those seeking unique works are among their clientele.

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“We didn’t even know we’d be here five years ago, but we’re moving it into different areas now,” Benniardi said. “We are excited for anything that comes our way, but we are taking things step by step.”

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